Renewal

Photography by Terri Pouliot

“There’s a big difference between empty fatigue and gratifying exhaustion. Know the difference. Life is too short. Invest in the activities (and relationships) you deeply care about. Value what you give your energy to. Focus on what matters and let go of what does not.”

–Marc Cheroff

I love this quote! Pause for a few moments and allow it to resonate deep within.

Redefine this Season of Spring. Go through each room of your spiritual ‘house’ and do some deep cleaning.

Liberate the mind, body and spirit by letting go of the things that are no longer meant to be. How do you know what these things are? If we spend any time at all getting quiet….and then really listening; we will know. Deep in our hearts, we will know.

Photography by Terri Pouliot

I live in a part of the world that fully undergoes four unique seasons. Some months, it may seem like all four of these changeable climates are rolled into one. With the seasons, our bodies and minds should naturally follow suit.

Many complain of feeling drained and tired after having gone through the harsh winter months. That’s when we truly need to re-evaluate our physical activities and the meals we are consuming. Get outdoors and breathe some fresh air. A brisk walk, especially in one of our beautiful parks; always soothes my spirit and energizes me.

The cold, dark winter months often mean dishes heavy on ‘comforting’ carbohydrates and not much in the way of vegetables. Now is the time to make that seasonal shift toward energizing and lighter foods.  Focus on creating meals that provide a wide array of colors and nourishment.  Exchange ’empty’ carbohydrates for satiating, complex carbohydrates. These keep us feeling full and provide energy needed for outdoor activities.

Photography by Terri Pouliot

And then there is the delicate issue of removing people and situations that may no longer be conducive for enjoying a positive and healthy way of living. It does not mean we don’t still love and care about those people or situations; just that it may be time to move on. It’s never an easy process. It can be downright painful.  Exchange activities that are draining for ones that promote feelings of excitement and growth.  No one feels energized while stagnant.

Our lives are a reflection of our interests.   Our physical design is an accessory that reflects our luxurious and delicious way of life.  We enjoy our lives most when we are energized by our surroundings.

Spring is the season of reawakening!

Nourishment

“Nothing can survive without food. Everything we consume acts either to heal us or to poison us. We tend to think of nourishment only as what we take in through our mouths, but what we consume with our eyes, our ears, our noses, our tongues, and our bodies is also food. The conversations going on around us, and those we participate in, are also food. Are we consuming and creating the kind of food that is healthy for us and helps us grow?”

–Thich Nhat Hanh

 

Welcome Spring

Photography by Tracy Sheppard

“We do not grow absolutely, chronologically. We grow sometimes in one dimension, and not in another; unevenly. We grow partially. We are relative. We are mature in one realm, childish in another. The past, present, and future mingle and pull us backward, forward, or fix us in the present. We are made up of layers, cells, constellations.”
― Anaïs Nin

Welcome Spring!

I’ve missed you so.

A season filled with renewal and beginnings. Beauty and bloom. Spread your arms wide and welcome new beginnings.

A season of growth, renewal, hope, and rebirth.

Photography by Tracy Sheppard

 

The Thoughtfully Designed Life © must carefully attend to all areas of living.

To focus primarily on the physical while ignoring the spiritual creates discord.  To feed the mind while disregarding the physical leaves us unhealthy

Tending to only one area of life creates uneven growth and a life without harmony. Balance is essential.

Spring is a wonderful time to intentionally clean up areas of life that have become stagnant and unyielding.  Purging those areas that are unproductive or unhealthy.  Getting rid of old thoughts, habits and activities that no longer serve us.

Photography by Tracy Sheppard

Asparagus

MP900314002

 

One of the first foods that signals the start of spring is the appearance of fresh asparagus at local farmers’ markets and grocery stores.  Take advantage of this seasonal gem.  It is not only delicious, but nutrient dense, as well.

According to Web MD, the name for asparagus — a member of the lily family — comes from the Greek word meaning “shoot” or “sprout.” Now widely cultivated throughout the world, this regal vegetable is believed to have originated 2,000 years ago in the eastern Mediterranean region, where it was prized for its unique texture and alleged medicinal and aphrodisiacal qualities.

Asparagus is loaded with nutrients and disease fighting abilities.

  • Asparagus is an excellent source of folate, fiber, Vitamins A, E, C, and K as well as chromium.
  • Asparagus is a rich source of glutathione, a detoxifying compound that helps break down carcinogens and harmful free radicals.
  • Asparagus is a rich source of Antioxidants, ranked as one of the top vegetables for its ability to neutralize cell damaging free radicals.
  • Asparagus contains anti-aging properties and is believed to help our brains with cognitive decline.
  • Asparagus contains high levels of the amino acid asparagine, which can act as a natural diuretic.
  • Asparagus can assist the body in eliminating excess salt.
  • Asparagus is considered a digestive support food.  One key factor in this regard is its inulin content.  Inulin is a unique type of carbohydrate called a polyfructan, and in practical terms, healthcare practitioners often refer to it as a “prebiotic.”
  • Asparagus is rich in B Vitamins
  • Asparagus contains approximately 26.80 calories per one cup serving (raw).
  • Asparagus should be roasted, grilled or stir-fried to maintain its nutritional content.

 

 

source:  Web MD

source:  Eating Well

Asparagus Tips